Forum Posts

Simon Schofield
May 25, 2022
In General Discussion
some groups are particularly affected, with a concentration of certain demographics within the digitally excluded The socially isolated tend to have more limited access to, and use of, the internet, devices and online services. The economically disadvantaged also have limited access but are more likely to try and seek out access in place like libraries. those who fall under both categories suffer most disadvantage and have little or no use at all. studies show that overall non-users are increasingly older, less educated, more likely to be unemployed, disabled, and socially isolated. Ipsos MORI identified employment status, educational qualification, and age as strong predictors of weather or not a household has internet access. It is worth noting that all groups are not homogeneous and there can be differences within populations. It's also important to take into account changing trends over time. People digitally disengaged in the past are different from those now, so approaches to tacking it must be adaptable. Older people have consistently made up the largest proportion of internet non-users, and pattern of internet use by age is replicated when looking at digital skills. A survey from citizens Advice Scotland 2018, showed that of respondents aged between 65 and 79 years: Only 25% used the internet often 46% never used the internet 18% have difficulty using a computer 16% cannot use one at all
Which groups are affected  content media
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Simon Schofield
May 18, 2022
In General Discussion
These figures suggest we need to build a better understanding of the relationship between social exclusion and digital technology. There are a number of views here. Digital participation can be a way to mitigate social exclusion by introducing disadvantaged groups access to the benefits of internet use (helsper and galacz 2009). Others suggest that offline social inequalities will translate into online social inequalities (Carnegie UK Trust, 2016B: Onoa, 2007). For example, access, design and implementation are often not considered from the perspective of those excluded, and so reproduce existing barriers and inequalities (Jaeger, 2012; Goggin and Newell 2007; Dobransky and Hargittai, 2006) some have argued these structural trends are creating an entrenched digital underclass (Helsper and Reisdorf, 2016 Age UK, 2013; choi and DiNitto, but identifying causality is difficult given how intertwined society and technology now is. Few studies have shown a change in individuals' social inclusion through a sustained engagement with information and communications technology (carnegie UK trust 2016b
Social Exclusion  content media
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Simon Schofield
May 10, 2022
In General Discussion
The Definition of digital exclusion has changed over the years, from a simple 'user/non-user to exploring different levels of internet use and skills divisions it has also grown to look at more than just internet use. Broad defined, digital exclusion is where a section of the population have continuing unequal access and capacity to use information and communications technologies (ict) that are essential to fully participate in society. Digital inclusion is about working with communities to address issues of opportunity, access, knowledge and skill in relation to using technology, and in particular, the internet. Many different terms are used interchangeably-digital inclusion, digital participation, digital capability, digital literacy-but essentially it's about people being able to use digital technologies, particularly the internet, in ways that enhance their lives and contribute to helping them overcome other disadvantages which they might face. Helsper 2012 identifies steps of digital engagement, ranging from basic use involving communication, intermediate use involving networking, and advanced use involving civic participation. Digital literacy must be looked at as part of inclusion. Users of the internet can still be digitally excluded because they lack the skills to be able to navigate the digital world.
Definitions of Digital Exclusion  content media
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Simon Schofield
May 04, 2022
In General Discussion
The internet and digital technology is very much at the heart now of how public, economic and social life functions. It has transformed how we work, communicate, consume, learn, entertain and access information and public services. And while it's become integral to all aspects of life, the spread of access and use is uneven and use is uneven and many people remain digitally excluded those who are ere excluded can be limited or unable to participate fully in society. The risk is that the divide between those with digital skills, and those who struggle to overcome barriers to access and use, the growing social and economic gap between those who are not continues to widen. How much and how often you use the internet can offer an insight into who could be considered digitally excluded, providing a way to assess how the internet and digital skills impacts on people lives.
The Internet and Disabled People  content media
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Simon Schofield
May 03, 2022
In General Discussion
Individuals with learning Disabilities may utilize several tools for broader access to digital resources. Its important for these to be compatible, so as not to restricted access. Abbreviation Expanders Abbreviation expenders are programs that automatically complete a word when the user enters a present code or abbreviation. This can enable learning disabled students to type faster with fewer spelling mistakes. Alternative Keyboards Alternative keyboards are a customizable option that users can program to better meet their needs. For those with learning disabilities, this may include adding graphics, grouping keys by color, and/or limiting input selections. Password Managers Individuals with learning disabilities may struggle to memorize passwords, so password mangers may be essential to maintain access to password-protected sites. Proofreading Programs Proofreading programs are widely used, but at their core, are a type of assistive technology. Spell checkers, grammar checkers, and other proofreading tools are valuable to help individuals with learning disabilities write more clearly and easily. Screen Readers Screen readers read screen text aloud, which may be beneficial for users with reading difficulties. Speech Recognition Programs. Individuals who have stronger verbal than writing skills may use a speech recognition program to transcribe dialogue through a microphone while the computer writes what they say. Touchscreen Due to their intuitive nature, devices with touchscreen capabilities may be easier for individuals with learning disabilities to master instead of traditional computers. Word Prediction software Prediction technology anticipates the word the user is typing based on context, frequency, and syntax. Not only can this save keystrokes, but may also help those who struggle with spelling and/or grammar improve their accuracy.
What Resources Can Help Improve Digital Inclusion And Accessibility For Users With Learning Disabilities  content media
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Simon Schofield
Apr 27, 2022
In General Discussion
Users with learning disabilities may use assistive technology, including browser add-ons and extensions. All of your content should work with these tools, support a personalized interface, and allow for simplification. Users should also be able to control when content changes. Besides following the best practices outlined in the WCAG standards, Davies shares several other "useful things to remember and easy gotchas." "The easiest way to make tools more accessible is by using colours with enough contrast," she advisers. "Avoiding using red and green to highlight pass/fail, look at ways to other colours or find other ways to highlight this." "Check your application works with a screen reader," adds Davies. "can people still learn and know what's going on without being able to see the page?" The British Dyslexia Association also recommends certain style guidelines to make web pages and other printed material more accessible for individuals with dyslexia. Suggestions include Front .use: sans serifs fronts, like Arial and Verdana 12-14 point front Character spacing around 35 percent of the letter width Word spacing at least 3.5 times character spacing Line spacing proportional to word spacing; 1.5 is usually best. Avoid: text in all uppercase letters and/ or small caps Underlining Italics Headings and Formatting Use: Front size 20 percent or more greater than normal text Extra space around headings Formatting tools for indents, lists, text alignment, etc. Hyperlinks that look different than other text Color Use: one background color Dark text A light background Contrast between text and background Avoid: Background patterns and pictures A white background Red, pink, and green (for colour blind users) Layout Use: Left-aligned text Lines under 70 characters White space around text Table of contents Regular section headings Avoid: text justification Columns Lines with too many characters Writing Style Use: Active voice Concise wording Simple sentences Images interspersed for support Bullet points and numbering Clear instructions Glossary of abbreviations and special terms Avoid: Double negatives Abbreviations
Support adaptation and personalization  content media
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Simon Schofield
Apr 13, 2022
In General Discussion
I am now into my 6th week of the come. the course is split into several subject areas correspond to activate you would typically encounter in a work place reception job. This includes filing, printing, diaries, meeting and greeting and taking bookings. I thoroughly enjoy this course and importantly is good preparation for the world of work
My Reception Course at North Tyneside Disability Forum  content media
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Simon Schofield
Apr 13, 2022
In General Discussion
From all our volunteers and staff at park view project
Happy Easter Everyone  content media
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Simon Schofield
Apr 12, 2022
In General Discussion
The term "learning disability" encompasses several disorders with a diverse array of signs and symptoms. Because of this, there is no one-size-fits-all solution to make the digital space more inclusive for those with learning disabilities. Luckily, many of the same accessible design principles that benefit individuals with other impairments may also be beneficial for the learning disabled. The web content Accessible Guidelines (WCAG) outline eight objectives critical to consider when designing for individuals with learning or cognitive disabilities. Help Users understand what things are and how to use them. Those who struggle to learn new information often prefer familiar design elements and terms. Using controls that visually represent their function along with standard terms, symbols, and element locations can make the interface easier for users to learn. Individuals with learning disabilities may also benefit from easy access to help and personalization options. Help users find what they need. Sites should make the most important features clear, possess a logical hierarchical menu structure, use an easy to understand page structure, make the important things easy to find, break media into chunks, and offer a search function. These design elements make it easier for users to find things without as much effort. Use clear and understandable content. The same writing techniques that make content easier for the general population to understand are also beneficial for those with learning disabilities. Text should use clear words, clear formatting and punctuation, simple tenses, and literal language. Content should also avoid double negatives and nested clauses, remain succinct, use white space effectively, other alternatives for numbers, explain implied information, separate instructions, and include necessary numbers and symbols for word deciphering. Long documents should include summarise and foreground written text should not be observed by the background. Help users avoid mistakes or correct them. Mistakes are often unavoidable when using ICTs, but designers should work to minimize the mistakes leaving disabled users are likely to make and provide easy ways to correct them. To help limit mistakes: Ensure controls and content remain stationary, design forms carefully, use flexible form inputs, notify users of fees upfront, use clear labels and safe. You can also help individuals with learning disabilities recover more quickly from mistakes by enabling users to go back, crafting forms to prevent mistakes, letting users undo form errors without much effort, and eliminating data loss and so-called "time outs." Help users to maintain focus. Distractions can be especially problematic for individuals with learning disabilities, so designs should aim to promote focus by limiting interruptions, making critical paths short, avoiding excessive content, and providing information to help users prepare for a task, such as what resources they'll need and how long it will take. Ensure Processes do not rely on memory. Processes that require memorization limit for individuals with learning disabilities or cognitive impairments. This is particularly important to keep in mind when designing logins. Those that do not rely on memory, single-step logins, login alternatives with fewer words, and other steps to limit the need for retaining information may provide greater accessibility. Similarly, voice menus should have a clear option to speak to a human, since remembering which numbers to input may be challenging. Provide help and support Users both with and without learning disabilities may get stuck and need help. Convenient access to assistance can get them back on track. Effective measures may include offering human guidance, providing alternative content for complex information. Noting the advantages and disadvantages of each of each option, including help or examples for forms and non-standard controls, Making it easy to ask questions or share feedback, assisting with directions, and sending remainders.
Best Practices for Accessibility  content media
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Simon Schofield
Apr 06, 2022
In General Discussion
Barriers to accessibility facing those with learning disabilities vary between individuals, but some are especially common. Most can be overcome through careful and considerate design. when people design and build website, they unfortunately don't always consider all the unique needs users needs have, explains accessibility advocate Seren Davies. "some examples of berries people can face are poor colour contrast, not being able to read text or tell pass and fail apart as it is just using colour". She shares. "Not being able to highlight text to guide themselves along while reading or have assistive technology read the text to them. Having sites and software not friendly for screen-readers to use, they miss out on lots of content as it is not being read aloud." Frequent interface changes It often takes learning disabled users longer to master the use of a platform or interface. Making frequent changes can prove to be a hurdle for those with learning disabilities, since they may have to invest more time to relearn after each change. Text-Heavy content Difficulty interpreting written text is one of the telltale symptoms of dyslexia, but it can also be present in other learning disabilities. Websites that rely exclusively on dense text may be more difficulty for these individuals to process. "Oftentimes websites have so munch information that they cram together on the page," says learning disability influencer Jacquelyn Taylor. "this is not accessible for people with learning disabilities since it's hard us to pick out the important information and we get lost easily when reading. This is why less crowded pages on website would be very helpful." Front and Colour selections Individuals with dyslexia, the most widely diagnosed learning disability, frequently face challenges reading certain front styles. The colour selection for the front and and the background can also impact the overall readability for individuals with the condition. "use good typography". says Davies. "As someone with dyslexia, i find swirly fronts particularly hard to read. Pick a front that is simple and easy to read, this way people can focus on the learning and not making out what it says." The colour selection for the font and the background can also impact the overall readability for individuals with the condition. "The easiest way to make tools more accessible is by using colours with enough contrast," she adds. Lack of Digital Skills While many individuals with learning disabilities have studied extensively to prepare them to read, write, do math, and conduct other tasks made more difficult by their disorders, digital skills are often overlooked by training programs.
Potential Barriers to Accessibility  content media
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Simon Schofield
Apr 05, 2022
In General Discussion
Some confuse learning disabilities with intellectual disabilities, but they are typically classified as two separate development disability. According to the individuals with Disabilities Education act, a learning disability is defined as a "disorder in one or more of the basic psychological involved in understanding in using language, spoken or written. " on the other hand, an intellectual disability is significantly subaverage general intellectual functioning, existing concurrently with deficits in adaptive behaviour and manifested during the development period." it continues. however in the United Kingdom, the term "intellectual disability" is often used refer to learning disabilities, adding to the confusion. While individuals with learning disabilities and those with learning disabilities and those with cognitive or intellectual disabilities share some similar observations regarding digital accessibility and inclusion, those with cognitive challenges frequently face additional barriers less common in those who are learning disabled. Common Types of Learning Disabilities "Learning disability" is a broad term used term used to describe several specific several specific diagnoses. Dyslexia, dyscalculia, dysgraphia, nonverbal learning disorder, and oral/written language disorder and specific reading comprehension deficit are among the most prevalent. Dyslexia According to the nonprofit Learning Disabilities Association of America, dyslexia is "characterized by deficits in accurate and fluent word recognition." This can lead to Difficulties with reading, writing, spelling, listening, and mixing up words. Dyslexia is one of the most widespread and well-known learning disabilities. The nonprofit International Dyslexia Association estimates that dyslexia-like symptoms may affect 15 to 20 percent of school-aged children in thw United States. Dyscalculia Dyscalculia causes difficulties understanding and calculating numbers. it may effect mathematical ability and quantitative reasoning. Dyscalculia dyscalculia is characterized by difficulties with written expression, including impaired writing ability and fine motor skills. Nonverbal Learning Disorders (NLD) While not included in the Diagnostic and statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), growing research suggests that nonverbal learning disorder can make it. challenge to interpret body language and facial expressions. It may also impair Coordinate. Oral/writing Language Disorder And Specific Reading Comprehension Deficit. Oral/writing language disorder and specific reading compression deficit can affect an individual understanding and/or expression of both spoken and written Language. Common Difficulties Associated with Learning disabilities While symptoms vary between different learning disabilities, and even between individuals with the same disorder, many face some all of the following Challenges Difficulties with hand-eye coordination Fine and gross motor skill including Attention problems, including ADHD Impulsivity Slower processing Trouble with logic and reasoning difficulty following directions Memory issues Sensory problems Difficulty staying organized Problems with sequencing
What Are Learning Disabilities and How are They Different From Intellectual Disabilities? 
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Simon Schofield
Mar 30, 2022
In General Discussion
Learning Disabilities must into account during the Digital design process to ensure digital inclusion and accessibility for the community this comprehensive guide outlines common learning disabilities, associated difficulties, accessibility barriers and best practices and more The digital divide separates those who can readily access computers and the internet from those who cannot. This gap exists for many different reasons-from socioeconomics to broadband availability -yet even when infrastructure and connectivity issues are resolved, approximately 61 million Americans and an estimated 1 billion people globally still face obstacles when it comes to utilizing the web due to a digital accessibility chasm between the abled and disabled. Disabilities impact how users interact with technology. without inclusion design, many individuals cannot access the same information and communication technology (ICT) resources many take for granted, including education and employment information, shopping options and social opportunities. "Learning shouldn't be something only those without disabilities get to do," explains Seren Davies, a full stack software engineer and accessibility advocate who is dyslexic. "it should be everyone. By thinking about digital accessibility advocate who is dyslexic. "it should be for everyone. By thinking about digital accessibility, we are making sure that everyone who wants to learn can." Learning Disabilities and digital inclusion Estimates suggest that 5 to 9 percent of the u.s. population have learning disabilities. however, despite such prevalence, may diagnosed individuals do not openly acknowledge their disorders due to lingering stigmas. According to the non-profit National Centre for Learning Disabilities, only one in four college students with learning disabilities disclose these to their schools, and just one in 20 young adults with learning disabilities receive workplace accommodations. A study published in the Journal of Learning Disabilities titled "the impact of learning disabilities on Adulthood: a review of the Evidenced-Based Literature for Research and Practice in Adult Education" points out that adults with learning disabilities must adapt for "employment, social and emotional, daily living routines, community, and recreation and leisure." The use of ICTs is widespread within all these spheres, so inaccessible websites and tools put those with learning disabilities at a disadvantage.
Improving Digital Inclusion for those with Learning Disabilities  content media
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Simon Schofield
Mar 23, 2022
In General Discussion
Social prescribing and similar approaches have been practised in the NHS for many years with schemes dating back to the 1990s, and some even earlier (the Bromley by Bow Centre was established in 1984). For long time, through, social prescribing was practised in pockets and largely unnoticed by national NHS bodies. The past few years have seen an important change: national NHS bodies have embraced social prescribing and committed resource to rolling it out across England. The NHS five year forward view (2014) opened the door with its focus on prevention, its emphasis on the role of the voluntary and community sector, and by citing examples of social prescribing schemes having a positive impact. Subsequently, the general practice forward view (2016) noted the role voluntary and community sector organisations, and particularly social prescribing, can play alongside GP services in offering people community-based support. The NHS long-term plan (2019) marked a step change in ambition by incorporating social prescribing into its comprehensive model of personalised care. Composed of six programmes including personalised health budgets, the model aims to enable people, particularly those with more complex needs, to take greater control of their health and rather than seeking to directly fund the groups that deliver social interventions, the long-term plan commits funding to the link workers who connect people to the range of support and engagement opportunities-largely run by charity and voluntary organisations-in their local area. The long-term plan set a target that by 2023/24 every GP practice in England will have access to a social prescribing link worker and 900,000 people will be referred by then. Primary care networks (PCNs), groupings of GP surgeries serving populations of around 30-50,000 patients, are the channel for this resource and in many cases will host the link-worker service. In 2019, a new five-year contract framework for general practices came into effect, which allows every PCN with a population of 30,000 or more to be reimbursed the cost of more than 100,000). By autumn 2020 national NHS bodies were reporting that more than 1,200 link workers were in post. Alongside funding link workers, national NHS bodies are seeking to grow the infrastructure that supports social prescribing, In 2019, the Department of Health and social care made £5 million available to establish a National Academy of social prescribing. The academy was officially formed as an independent charity in 2020, with support from a number of partner organisations, such as NHS England and NHS improvement and sport England; it plans to focus on raising the profile of social prescribing, building the evidence base and sharing prescribing and explore funding partnerships. Other government departments have shown a growing interest in the potential of non-clinical interventions in recent years. In 2018 the government's strategy to tackle loneliness backed the roll-out of social prescribing, and in 2020 the Department for Environment, food and rural Affaires announced funding for two-year trial of 'green social prescribing'- initiatives intended to help people engage with the natural world.
How does social prescribing fit in wider health and care policy  content media
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Simon Schofield
Mar 22, 2022
In General Discussion
There is a growing body of evidence that social prescribing can lead to a range of positive health and wellbing outcomes. Studies have pointed to improvements in quality of life and emotional wellbeing, mental and general wellbing, and levels of depression and anxiety. For example, An evaluation of a social prescribing project in Bristol from the early 2010s highlighted improvements in anxiety levels and in feelings about general health and quality of life. And a study of a scheme in Rotherham (a liaison service helping people access support from more than 8 in 10 people referred to the scheme who were followed up 3 to 4 moths later, there were reductions in NHS use in terms of accident and emergency (A&E) attendance, outpatient appointments and inpatient admissions. Exploratory analysis of the scheme suggested that it could pay for itself over 18-24 months due to reduced NHS use. More recent evaluations have pointed to similar opportunities. A community connector scheme in Bradford reported improvements in service users' health-related quality of life and social connectedness (among other measures). And a programme in Shropshire, evaluated between 2017 and 2019, found that people reported statistically significant improvements in measures of wellbing, patient activation and loneliness. At three-month follow up, It also found that GP consultations among participants were down 40 per cent compared to a control group While experience-much of it positive-continues to accumulate about social prescribing, there remain weaknesses in the evidence base. Many studies scale are small scale, do not have a control group, focus on progress rather than outcomes, or relate to individual interventions rather than the social prescribing model. Much of the evidence available in qualitative and relies on self-reported outcomes. Determining the cost, resource implications and cost-effectiveness of social prescribing is particularly difficult. Several studies highlight the importance of measuring the wider social value generated through social prescribing, for example through social prescribing, for example through reducing welfare benefit claims. Again, this be difficult to measure, and may require a longer-term approach. A recent study found that more than half of the outcomes social prescribing can deliver are not being routinely measured in evaluation frameworks. Overall, the evidence available today offers good reason to think social prescribing can deliver benefits for some people. But as a number of recent meta-analyses and Public Heath England have concluded, Further work is needed to strengthen the evidence base and clarify expectations of what benefits can be delivered and for whom.
Does Social Prescribing Work content media
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Simon Schofield
Mar 16, 2022
In General Discussion
Social prescribing, also sometime know as community referral, is a means of enabling health professionals to refer people to range of local, non-clinical services. The referrals generally, but not exclusively, come from professionals working in primary care settings for example, GPs or practice nurses. Recognising that people's health and wellbeing are determined mostly by a range of social economic and environmental factors, social prescribing seeks to address people's needs in a holistic way. It also aims to support individuals to take greater control of their or health. Social delivering social prescribing can involve a range of activities that are typically provided by voluntary and community sector organisations. Examples include volunteering, arts activities, group learning, gardening, befriending, cookery, healthy eating advice a range of sports. social prescribing is designed to support people with a wide range of social, emotional or practical needs, and many schemes are focused on improving mental health and physical wellbeing. Those who could benefit from social prescribing schemes include people with mild or long-term mental health problems, people with complex needs, people who are socially isolated and those with multiple long-term conditions who frequently attend either primary or secondary health care. There are different models of social prescribing being employed across England. Most involve a link worker (other terms such as community connector, navigator and heath adviser are also used) who works with people to access local sources of support. For example, at the Bromley By Bow centre, a community and primary care hub in East London with a long history of social prescribing and other community-focused work, staff work with people, often over several sessions, to help them get involved with local services ranging from swimming lessons to financial advice services. Social prescribing can be understood as one of a family of approaches, sometimes called community-centred approaches, which aim to mobilise the power of communities to generate good health.
What is social prescribing 
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Simon Schofield
Mar 15, 2022
In General Discussion
I was presented with my certificate on Monday the 14.3.2022 i have achieved the following in English skills Entry 2 and NOCN Entry Level Certificate in Preparing for Further Learning or Employment Entry 3
Certificate  content media
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Simon Schofield
Mar 09, 2022
In General Discussion
As internet use among Americans of all ages increasingly becomes second nature, there has been an intergenerational conversation within the family-between parents and their children, and among seniors and their children and grandchildren-about online safety. today's parents are the first generation to be confronted with technology use by their parents and elderly relatives, as well as their children, and are in uncharted. This study confirms families' significant participation in the growing ecosystem of online services, and their role on the frontlines of navigating various online threats and managing the use of tools and technologies to protect their safety and security online. This report offers new insights into the impact of technology on families and fills in some of the informational gaps about the benefits and challenges of being online. To get a more complete picture of how Americans are faring across the digital landscape, this report consists of two surveys: a survey of senior citizens and a survey of parents. the surveys oversampled the African American, Hispanic, and low-income communities to better understand the unique challenges these groups and their children face, and the choices they make. Seniors and parents realize the benefits of using the internet and technology. two in three online seniors say technology has had a positive effect on their lives. Many online seniors report they use social media and navigation apps, and shop online. Fewer use the internet for health-related services or grocery delivery, but many express interest in doing so. Parents of connected children are nearly twice as likely to feel technology and the internet have made their job as a parent easier rather than harder. Technology and the internet help with children's homework, and provide access to entrainment, information, and educational content. parents report being online helps their children build technology skills, research information, foster career skills, and creativity, and enhances their performance in school. But challenges remain. About seven in 10 online seniors are concerned about identity theft computer viruses and malware, and hacking of financial accounts. Across most other online safety concerns explored in the survey, African and Hispanic seniors are more likely than whites to worry about them. Most of the 20% of seniors who do not use the internet report they have little interest in being online. Parents are concerned about keeping their connected children safe online, noting they find it challenging to monitor their connected safe online, noting they find it challenging to monitor their child's use of technology, access to inappropriate content, who their child is engaging with, and total screen time. Social media use in particular worries parents; by a sizable margin, parents think the potential harms of their child having a social media account outweigh the potential benefits. While a majority of parents rate themselves as highly confident in their ability to keep track of and manage their child's use of technology, this confidence diminishes as both parents and children become older. Most digital families proactively protect themselves. More than nine in 10 seniors take at least one step to protect personal information online and nearly half take two or more steps, such as using strong passwords, using unique passwords for each of their accounts, and installing anti-virus software. Nearly two thirds of parents report using at least one parental. Control tool, and interest in parental controls is high among those who do not already use them. in addition, most parents have faith that their child fully appreciates the need to be safe and guard personal information online and understands that things said or posted online are never truly deleted. Technology, has the power to bring families together across generations. Despite the challenges, most parents think technology has improved communication among their family members. Nearly eight in ten parents or elderly relatives say these relatives use text messaging, e-mail, or social media to communicate with them. and importantly, both parents and seniors are talking to thir children and grandchildren about the importance of being safe online.

Technology has the power to bring families together across generations   content media
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Simon Schofield
Mar 02, 2022
In General Discussion
The biggest for digital access can be the cost of new devices, coupled with data costs, which can run into hundreds of pounds. However, rebooting and repurposing unused devices is a simple and cost-effective way of helping to solve this problem and enable online access for learning, employment, information seeking, or even connecting and communicating with friends and family. We live in a two-tier society, separated by a digital divide. In our communities, there are school children with no means of doing schoolwork or keeping in touch with their peers. Hidden from sight are elderly people with no way of connecting with their loved ones. Held back by circumstance are adults keen to improve their job prospects but unable to access free online training or search the internet for more fulfilling positions. Unfortunately, these people-the ones who need the technology the most-are those least likely to be able to afford new devices and connections. It would be impossible to buy the 1.9m new devices needed to get each digitally excluded household in the uk online however, 11 million unused devices lie unused in homes and offices. By rehoming just 10% of these unused devices, we can narrow the digital divide
Setting up digital re-purposing scheme  content media
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Simon Schofield
Mar 01, 2022
In General Discussion
Cyberbullying is becoming a matter of increasing concern. Thankfully, it has been brought to public awareness and there are a number of steps that can be taken to prevent its occurrence. The role of a parent is to be in touch with the emotions and thoughts of their child or adolescent and to notice if they are depressed or otherwise acting strangely. if your child actually says to you that they are being bullied. online or in school, than you can consider quite lucky. the majority of adolescents and children never admit it to their parents, and statistics show if they do tell some, it is more likely to be peers or siblings. Males are less likely to confide in anyone when they are bullied. There could be a large number of reasons why the person is acting the way they are acting aside from cyberbullying. The first step is always identification of the issue. And the earlier that the activity is identified and brought under scrutiny, the better. You may have to ask your child if they are being bullied. Or you can ask the teacher, who also has a responsibility to report these in the school where they originate. Depending on the age of the child or adolescent, the best preventative measure may be to restrict technology to as large an extent as possible. There is an increasing amount of evidence to suggest that children under the age of 7 or so should not have too much access to any kind of technological device. The fact is that these devices increase the chances of cyberbullying, and the online world is simply not a place that a child is ready for. additionally, there could be multiple adverse health consequences to having children and adolescents using these types of technological devices for extended time periods. Because of the rate at which technology is progressing and the recency of digital devices, there have been no longitudinal studies conducted on the consequences of continued exposure to smartphone, wifi, ipads, and, and other types of technology. Young children, in particular, should be massively restricted in the use such devices. An alternative to restricting devices outright is to restrict the sites that are allowed to be viewed by your child or adolescent. You can do this at the level of your internet service provider, which means that all devices that use your home internet must follow its rules in relation to what sites are restricted. This is similar to what happens in corporations that have lists of allowed sites and rules regarding downloading particular files and applications. If you are buying your child a smartphone, there are a number of parental control apps that you can get on your phone. Most of them can notify parents about suspicious or harmful messages, restrict access to specific apps completely or just set time limits, and some include gps tracking to show the child's location in real-time. It is actually very easy to put controls in place to prevent children from accessing particular sites and there are many free options available. Some helpful tips about parental controls: use parental controls on video game consoles. players often talk to and message each other in video games. Set up an account for you child, limit who they can talk to, and monitor the content or particular games. become familiar with how to mute, block, and report people on all social media sites, including twitter, Facebook, tiktok snatched discord and Instagram. teach your children how to do this too. It's easy to block other people on social media sites, video games consoles, and even phone calls. If your child feels bullied online, tell them to simply block and report the person. Emails addresses can also be blocked. set up private accounts for your children so you can chose who can view their content. change passwords and contact websites or services if you think someone has hacked your Childs account is pretending to be them online. Most recognized sites are quite helpful when it comes to security issues Aside from how to come with cyberbullying. It can be a good idea to set up guidelines for children and young adults to fallow in general when using technology. These guidelines can give your child information on being careful about who they are taking to, refusing to accept friend requests from strangers, and not giving away personal information online or offline. Other information to include can be how to store passwords, not using the phone late at night and not using the phone when driving or doing other tasks. It is also a good idea to set an example for children and adolescents. This is because they often take cues from their parents, and follow their lead. these habits and examples can follow them for the rest of their lives, so it is good to follow best practices early on to prevent any incidents down the line.
How to prevent cyberbullying  content media
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Simon Schofield
Feb 23, 2022
In General Discussion
There are a number of cyberbullying statistics to take note of, and they are a strong indication that is becoming that is becoming something of an epidemic. It is a very serious concern and not something to be taken lightly, or that child will grow out of. 34% of academic students will experience cyberbullying during their lifetime girls are twice as likely to be victims of cyberbullying Victims of cyberbullying have a higher risk of depression even compared to victims of traditional bullying face to face. Children are 7 times more likely to be cyberbullied by friends than by strangers. Children who are bullied are 9 times more likely to be the victim of identify fraud as well. 70% of students report seeing frequent bullying bullying online Many cyberbullies don't use the internet to find victims they use digital technology to bully people who they are already bullying elsewhere. According to a Warwick study, 99% of students would have been bullied regardless of new technology, so digitalization has only added an extra percent. What this really represents is that digital technology is not the problem by itself. but it make an existing problem far worse. Digital platforms are simply are simply a tool to reach existing victims. The statistics for adolescents that are bullied online and in-person are very similar. The most common reasons reported by students for bullying are appearance (27%), race(10%), ethnicity (7%) gender (7%) disability (4%) religion (4%) and sexual orientation (3%) as reported by the national centre for educational statistics in 2017. Another trend that continually plays itself out is that those who are bullied typically go on to bully more people. Girls are most likely to report that they are being cyberbullied. Most commonly, cyberbullying occurs when the other person is seen as different is some way. The cultural context of the particulars school may have an influence on whether or not the is bullied. Generally, there are 4 major types of bullying. These are social media, harassment, flaming, and exclusion. Social media bullying is all forms of bullying that take place on social media platforms, such as Facebook or twitter. Harassment is the repetition of negative threats that can occur via different channels, either in groups or alone. Flaming is the public shaming and humiliation of certain individuals, so other people can see, either online or offline. And exclusion is where the individual is ignored or not invited to social events. The victim can then be made fun of among the group without the victim knowing. Flaming is the most humiliating and can stay with the child or adolescent the longest, depending on how long it lasts. But exclusion can be the most difficult to gain evidence of and troubleshoot, as it is nearly impossible to prove. For example somebody might be deleted from a friends list or not an event, which is not exactly an offense on behalf of the child or student. on a more positive note, while cyberbullying is on the rise, physical bullying has been on a steady decline for many years. According to the national centre for educational statistics, the number of students reporting being bullied at school has dropped from 28% in 2009 to 22% in 2019. Female students reported more instances of verbal bullying, and male students reported physical bullying. The difficulty with cyberbullying is that it most frequently takes place on instant messaging services, such as Instagram, WhatsApp, Tiktok, Discord and snapchat because these messages are encrypted and private, there is no snapchat. Because these messages are encrypted and private, there is no real record unless you physically take the device from your child and look at the messages. Emails and public comments are much more easily recorded.
Cyberbullying Trends and Statistics  content media
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